The All Things Plants Database

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By spiderjoe on Mar 30, 2015 1:16 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Wind Beneath My Sails')

Only puts out about 5-7 buds in the north

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By spiderjoe on Mar 30, 2015 1:13 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Isabelle Rose')

This plant is excellent in every way. Totally worth the money I spent on it.

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By spiderjoe on Mar 30, 2015 1:03 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Starring Attraction')

Annette gave me this one as a bonus. Changes colour as the day goes on. Plant has large scapes and very good branching and bud count .

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By spiderjoe on Mar 30, 2015 12:50 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Ojo De Dios')

Nice wide spaced branching and excellent bud count.

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By spiderjoe on Mar 30, 2015 12:46 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Skeleton Man')

A SEV in the north. This plant puts out a ton of foliage and only a few scapes.

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By Moonhowl on Mar 29, 2015 5:51 PM, concerning plant: Hosta (Hosta 'Humpback Whale')

Hosta 'Humpback Whale' was introduced in 2012 following breeder Mildred Seaver's death. It was reported that this giant blue-green hosta was auctioned at the 2006 AHS convention for $3700 for a single plant.

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By Moonhowl on Mar 29, 2015 5:36 PM, concerning plant: Hosta (Hosta 'T-rex')

Hosta 'T-Rex,' also called Tom Rex, is from a cross of H. montana f. macrophylla X 'Big John.'

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By Moonhowl on Mar 29, 2015 5:31 PM, concerning plant: Hosta (Hosta 'Komodo Dragon')

Hosta 'Komodo Dragon' was introduced by Mildred Seaver, one of 95 introductions on the list of
her hosta cultivars.

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By Moonhowl on Mar 29, 2015 5:25 PM, concerning plant: Hosta (Hosta 'Empress Wu')

Hosta 'Empress Wu' is considered to be the largest-leaf hosta and was introduced by Brian and Virginia Skaggs. It was a selected seedling of Hosta 'Big John' (Clarence Owens, 1986)

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By Calif_Sue on Mar 28, 2015 8:25 PM, concerning plant: Sturt's Desert Pea (Swainsona formosa)

Australian native flower that is the state floral emblem for South Australia

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By jmorth on Mar 28, 2015 1:02 PM, concerning plant: Jonquilla Daffodil (Narcissus 'Kedron')

'American bred by Willis Wheeler, several vivid orange cups 'bleed' their color into the rich bronzy yellow perfectly formed petals of this lusciously fragrant flower; 12" to 15"; mid spring.'
Description thanks to Brent and Becky's Bulbs.

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By valleylynn on Mar 28, 2015 9:40 AM, concerning plant: Lady's Eardrops (Fuchsia 'Oddfellow')

Chosen by the Independent Order of Oddfellows to carry their name.
At this time it does not appear to be available in the United States.

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By 4susiesjoy on Mar 28, 2015 8:29 AM, concerning plant: Cutleaf Daisy (Erigeron compositus)

Dainty little wild flower that self seeds prolifically. It works well in a rock garden and prefers well drained soil. It blooms in early spring and its flowers add a cheerful presence to the early spring garden.

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By jmorth on Mar 27, 2015 11:55 AM, concerning plant: Trumpet Daffodil (Narcissus 'Pink o' Dawn')

The hybridizer, Crawford Radcliff, an Australian from Tasmania, created two cultivars of the same name in the same year (1931) from the same seed parent (Mrs. W. Moodie) but different pollen parents (this entry's pollen parent was Lemon Star, the other was Lord Kitchener).

Radcliff has created same-named daffodils on more than one occasion (ex.- LaGana, and I recall others). Why? Go figure...

This particular cultivar has an illustrious history in the world of daffodil breeding. It is seed fertile and was used in this capacity 22 times. It is also pollen fertile and was used 30 times in that role. Resultant cultivars number 42 named daffodils. The rest were numbered seedlings. The creators of the named offspring were all from Australia and New Zealand, except for four from Northern Ireland. This happened mostly in the middle part of the last century.

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By farmerdill on Mar 26, 2015 10:31 AM, concerning plant: Brussels Sprouts (Brassica oleracea 'Prince Marvel')

Grew Prince Marvel in Virginia's New River Valley. Transplanted in July, topped at Thanksgiving harvest at Christmas. Performed much better than Catskill and long Island improved under those conditions.

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By farmerdill on Mar 26, 2015 10:26 AM, concerning plant: Cabbage (Brassica oleracea 'Point One')

Very small, very early (1-2 lb conehead) hybrid. Performs well in spring planting.

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By Marilyn on Mar 26, 2015 12:04 AM, concerning plant: Crocus (Crocus sieberi subsp. sublimis 'Tricolor')

A beautiful and colorful crocus! I've grown a few of these before and they're a very special variety! They're so distinctive looking and all the colors complement each other in a wonderful and pleasing way. A cheery sight to see after a cold and snowy winter!

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By Marilyn on Mar 25, 2015 11:27 PM, concerning plant: Crocus (Crocus vernus 'Twilight')

After seeing Newyorkrita's pics of Twilight last Spring in the database and the bulb forum, I had to get 25 of them myself this past Fall. The flowers are a gorgeous deep purple. I've never grown and/or seen a crocus such a dark purple. Outstanding in the garden from a distance and close up! I'm getting more this Fall! A gem of a crocus!

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By Marilyn on Mar 25, 2015 10:59 PM, concerning plant: Snow Crocus (Crocus chrysanthus 'Cream Beauty')

Years ago, I bought many packages locally of what was supposed to be Crocus 'Blue Pearl'. The following spring, I realized that the flowers of Blue Pearl turned out to be Crocus 'Cream Beauty'. At first I was disappointed, but in time I discovered I loved Cream Beauty. The creamy yellow color of the flowers, mixed with the bright orange color of the stamens, makes this a beautiful and memorable crocus. It lasted many years in my garden until the wild rabbits discovered the clump. The rabbits ate not only the leaves, but also the flowers, and the bulb needs the leaves to store up energy for the following year.

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By Dutchlady1 on Mar 25, 2015 6:13 PM, concerning plant: Plumeria (Plumeria rubra 'Vera Cruz Rose')

This is a profusely blooming Plumeria variety; in the Florida Keys it never stopped blooming all winter long.

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