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Iris (Iris 'Tropical Delight')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Persian Buttercup (Ranunculus asiaticus 'Bloomingdale Mix')
Photo by Catmint20906
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Iris (Iris 'Trick of the Light')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Iris (Iris 'Trial by Fire')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus Snapshot™ Burgundy)
Photo by Catmint20906
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Iris (Iris 'Treasured')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Angelonia (Angelonia angustifolia Archangel™ Raspberry Improved)
Photo by Catmint20906
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Iris (Iris 'Touch of Mahogany')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Iris (Iris 'Totally Tropical')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Miagos Bush (Osmoxylon lineare)
Photo by Dutchlady1
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Iris (Iris 'Titan's Glory')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Miagos Bush (Osmoxylon lineare)
Photo by Dutchlady1
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Iris (Iris 'Thinking of You')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Iris (Iris 'Texas Tradition')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Miagos Bush (Osmoxylon lineare)
Photo by Dutchlady1
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Iris (Iris 'Texas Renegade')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Iris (Iris 'Tempting Fate')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Iris (Iris 'Temporal Anomaly')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Iris (Iris 'Tempesto')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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Iris (Iris 'Tayberry')
Photo by Calif_Sue
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By chalyse on Jul 31, 2014 4:49 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Breathless Beauty')

In Zone 9b (Local Temps = 25 Min/108 Max)

Vigor and Flower: I had mixed success with Breathless Beauty in our 9b gardens. The blooms never really stabilized in color here, though when it did bloom true to form it was indeed "breathless" in beauty. The long petals recurved nicely by afternoon at the higher temps this zone reaches. Ultimately, though, it failed to thrive here no matter its location (full sun, partial or full shade) and so I gave away the fans.

Scape and Foliage: It never really took hold, losing narrower foliage faster than it was replaced, and suffered almost constant leaf streak. One of those cultivars that, for us, meant constant clean-up of spent foliage, with streaked foliage predominating. The scape was straight and strong and held blooms nicely up from the foliage.

Overall, perhaps a cultivar that performs much better in slightly cooler climates.

Thumbs up For an alternative purple-red (ruby) dip that shines in 9b heat and full sun, I recommend Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Woodside Ruby') .

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By bonitin on Jul 31, 2014 1:15 AM, concerning plant: Peruvian Lily (Alstroemeria 'Freedom')

I find Alstroemeria 'Freedom' identical to Alstroemeria 'Red Coat', I can compare them as I have both!

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By Weedwhacker on Jul 30, 2014 4:27 PM, concerning plant: Wild Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa)

This native of Eurasia is a seriously invasive, non-native species in our area. It seems important to note that there are chemicals in the leaves, stems, and flowers that can cause skin rashes, burns, and blisters, especially in the presence of sunlight. Please use caution if you are thinking about growing this plant.

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By chalyse on Jul 30, 2014 12:05 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Amethyst Cream Truffle')

In Zone 9b (Local Temps = 25 Min/108 Max)

Vigor and Flower: Amethyst Cream Truffle has done well in partial shade, though it took a few blooms to stabilize in form and color. Once bloom is well underway, the size, shape, and color were extremely pleasing. Large, loosely flowing doubles are an elegant addition and are my preference over very tightly collected and ruffles ones. Blooms open well in the morning. Has Victoria's Secret in its lineage, rated as resistant to rust by a 2003 grower's survey, which means that less than 50% of the plant's surface showed disease when exposed to rust. This has been noted as being visually acceptable, easily trimmed of infected leaf ends, entirely self-recovering without need for treatment, and a good choice for hybridizing toward resistance.

Scape and Foliage: The scapes are thick, strong, and straight, holding the blooms nicely above the foliage. Foliage is wide, full, and lush.

Fertility: Sets pods well, did not use the pollen to cross this year so will follow up next year.

Overall a very good performer in 9b.

Thumbs up For those who'd prefer a similar double that more quickly settles in and displays true to form, I recommend Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Mulberry Truffle') ... though the wait on Amethyst Cream Truffle is short enough that you may just enjoy having both to display or hybridize.

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By ARoseblush on Jul 30, 2014 9:10 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Ruby Lipstick')

'Ruby Lipstick' (a John Benz daylily), was added to my garden in May, 2014. I won it from Abundant Daylilies, a favorite hybridizer of mine earlier in the year. When it arrived it was a very small 3 fans. I remember thinking at that time, "No way this plant will bloom this year." In fact, I was worried that the plant might not make it through our very cold winter. I planted it very carefully and fed it with alfalfa meal and a fish nutrient tea. In six weeks, this plant has tripled in size, and sent up 2 scapes. I am just thrilled with this increase, and even more so as I will get to see it bloom in a few weeks.

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By ARoseblush on Jul 30, 2014 8:46 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Emerald Dream')

On 'Emerald Dream,' I have posted a picture of a great example of what "rebloom scapes" should look like. In this pix, you see 4 new scapes in the middle of the foliage. Emerald Dream was the first plant to bloom in my Vermont (Zone 4b) garden. Its first bloom was in the middle of June, 2014. Six weeks later, it is still blooming, while sending up rebloom scapes as well. Emerald Dream is a "dream" plant in my garden.

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By RickCorey on Jul 29, 2014 6:05 PM, concerning plant: Cos Lettuce (Lactuca sativa 'Little Gem')

A small, green, romaine-type lettuce.
The small blanched heart is a gourmet delicacy.

'Little Gem' has some heat tolerance, but it grows better in cooler temps.
In hot climates, 'Little Gem' is best as a spring or fall crop.
If you have mild summers, succession plant it all summer long.

Like most lettuces, it needs moist rich soil. 33-50 DTM.
800 seeds/gram. (One gram is listed as seeding a 15' row.)
Because the heads are compact, thin to 6.5" x 6.5" for maximum yield.

Barely cover seeds. Germination temperature: 40-75°F. Emerges in 2-5 days.

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By wildflowers on Jul 29, 2014 4:40 PM, concerning plant: Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Mortgage Lifter')

A nice slicer tomato with good old fashioned flavor and meaty texture. Not a bad producer once it gets going, this one is still giving nice sized fruits during our hot summer months.

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By farmerdill on Jul 29, 2014 4:00 PM, concerning plant: Melon (Cucumis melo 'Ogen')

A great little melon that I grew in the 70's and 80's in Virginia. Does not do well here in Georgia. I like green fleshed melons so I moved up to the hybrid Galia types. Basically the same flavor but more adaptable to my present conditions.

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By EdBurton on Jul 29, 2014 2:12 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'The Goldilocks Effect')

I bought The Goldilocks Effect in the summer of 2013.
The first time I saw it in bloom is this summer 2014, and by far it is one of the best looking polychromes I have ever seen.
Size is huge, flowers open wide with flawless blooms, seems to be an easy pod setter, branching and bud count are good and I expect it to only get better as plant grows to clump size, and it grows in the frozen tundra of NE Wisconsin!
How sweet is that?
I have been spreading the pollen on everything, this plant is on the grow forever list for me.
Highly recommended.
Ed Burton

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By dbrawner on Jul 29, 2014 1:32 PM, concerning plant: Peach (Prunus persica)

It makes for a great smoking wood for bbq ribs and pulled pork. :-D

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By flaflwrgrl on Jul 29, 2014 11:54 AM, concerning plant: Jelly Palm (Butia capitata)

Pindo palms are one of the most cold hardy of the feather palms. They have beefy trunks, covered with persistent leaf bases. The fronds are gracefully arching and curve back down toward the ground and then in toward the trunk. It is a slow but steady grower. They will begin producing fruit at about 8 or 9 years of age. The fruit can be messy when it falls on sidewalks, driveways, or patio areas, so you will want to plant it far enough away from those areas so that it doesn't cause problems. I would say 12 to 15 feet would certainly do it.
This is a palm that can be planted beneath power lines because of its height limit.

Native to South America, ranging through northern Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, and southern Brazil.

When mature, it produces copious amounts of fruit. The fruit is wonderfully fragrant, and if you get anywhere near it, your nose will pick up the sweet, tropically fruity aroma. The fruits are used to make jelly and wine. They are very fibrous and have a single large seed, slightly larger than a cherry pit and dark brown in color. You can chew the fruit and spit out the fiber, or bite into it and suck on the juice. Be careful as the juice will run down your hands and arms. Yes, they are that juicy! The flavor has been described in many, many ways, all involving a mixture of more commonly known fruit flavors.

In my personal experience, the first thing that hits your taste buds is tartness, but not horribly so. Less than a second later, strawberry mingles in, followed by banana, and then a sweet mango-orange flavor, all of the flavors mixing together in a delicious fusion, all the while tickling your nose with the scents of the tropics.

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By SongofJoy on Jul 29, 2014 11:31 AM, concerning plant: Melon (Cucumis melo 'Ogen')

Small Israeli melon with a tropical flavor. Very aromatic and sweet. Small size and easily grown on a trellis. Ripe rind turns golden color.

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By poisondartfrog on Jul 29, 2014 7:22 AM, concerning plant: Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Champagne Cherry')

Heavy fruit set of small cherry tomatoes, pale yellow to near white when ripe. Very sweet.

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By chalyse on Jul 28, 2014 9:06 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Spanish Sketch')

In Zone 9b (Local Temps = Min 25/Max 108)

Vigor and Flower: Spanish Sketch has done very well in partial shade in 9b, with no insect infestations seen, and does well growing slowly as it winters over in the garden. The background color of the petals when viewed in the morning show the nice subtle pastels and shading of a dormant, and deepen and clarify into full tet. colors by mid-day. It was tested by the University of Arkansas in 2001 and was ranked as being highly resistant to rust there, which means that few or no pustules were observed on the plant's surfaces when exposed to rust. This is noted as an excellent possibility for both garden display and hybridizing toward resistance.

Scape and Foliage: The scape is medium thickness and very sturdy, though it can sometimes take on a not unpleasing slight but upright "S" shape. It holds multiple blooms very nicely and at a very attractive height over the foliage. The fans are able to maintain wider-bladed and more plentiful foliage, starting out a little thin-bladed in center growth, but thick at the outer edges of the fan, and hold eight or more blades on each fan. Spanish Sketch's foliage has stayed a deep green compared to most others.

Overall an excellent choice for garden and hybridizing performance.

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By flaflwrgrl on Jul 28, 2014 8:25 PM, concerning plant: Crape Myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica 'Tuscarora')

Tuscarora Crepe Myrtle is a stunner! The blooms are absolutely vibrant. The Tuscarora has tan, heavily exfoliating bark, which reveals a slightly deeper shade of trunk underneath. The bloom period for this Crepe Myrtle runs about 70 days, starting in early July. It puts on a show, too, with heavy bloom where the panicles are 8 inches wide by 12 inches long. Tuscarora sports an upright vase shape and has a slightly slower growth rate than many varieties, but its spectacular floral display makes up for the slower growth rate.
Tuscarora is one of the cultivars developed by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture National Arboretum, and as such has outstanding mildew resistance. The Arboretum introduced it in 1981.
This cultivar is a great choice for limited spaces because of its growth habit.

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By TBGDN on Jul 28, 2014 3:53 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Silver Pink')

This came directly from Gilbert Wild Nursery back in the Mid-1990's. It has survived several transplants as well as total shade, hot sun, and soggy soil conditions. Although not showy or "glitzy," it has a quaint charm about it that is appealing when viewed along a shady path in the garden. We've grown it approximately 16-18 years: It is a very rugged plant.

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By kqcrna on Jul 28, 2014 3:48 PM, concerning plant: Blackcurrant Sage (Salvia x jamensis 'Hot Lips')

I have this plant in a container near my front porch and the hummingbirds visit it often. It has produced mostly solid red blossoms with just a few bicolor ones.

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By chalyse on Jul 28, 2014 6:54 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Dream Legacy')

In Zone 9b (Local Temps = Min 25/Max 108)

Vigor and Flower: Dream Legacy succumbed to crown rot the spring after it was planted here, following persistent struggles with aphid infestations during the prior summer, and never produced a bloom.

Foliage: Foliage was somewhat on the narrow side which makes it difficult for a cultivar to do well here, and the plant is a dormant which can also be problematic in our climate.

Thumbs up My recommended alternative tet with wider foliage for 9b would include evergreen Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Spanish Sketch')

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By bonitin on Jul 28, 2014 5:47 AM, concerning plant: Kiwi Fruit (Actinidia deliciosa)

I had a male plant in the past. It made flowers, but of course no fruit as I didn't have a female.
Now I have only a female plant as the male died due to Vine Weevils.
As I had no more space for another male, I wasn't really expecting fruit on the female Kiwi vine, but to my surprise it does give fruit without a male!

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