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By Surroundx on Apr 24, 2015 9:31 PM, concerning plant: Lima Orchid (Chloraea undulata)

This species was recently rediscovered: http://elcomercio.pe/peru/lima/esta-orquidea-se-creia-extint...

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By valleyrimgirl on Apr 24, 2015 8:34 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Sun Dried Tomatoes')

Its name is Sundried Tomatoes.

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By jmorth on Apr 24, 2015 12:14 AM, concerning plant: Small Cupped Daffodil (Narcissus 'Chungking')

Chungking is a classic small-flowered daffodil from Northern Ireland (registered 1943) of yellow petals and an orange cup. Very colorful. It was awarded the First Class Certificate in 1950 and the Award of Merit in 1948 (both from RHS). The hybridizer was Guy L. Wilson, who crossed Market Merry and Clackrattle to produce Chungking. Said cultivar is both seed and pollen fertile. 34 cultivars can call Chungking dad and 20 others owe their existence to its pollen, totaling 54 named cultivars. There are an additional 17 registered seedling crosses, making a total of 71 official offspring.

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By mellielong on Apr 23, 2015 12:36 PM, concerning plant: Golden Club (Orontium aquaticum)

The book "How to Know the Wildflowers" (1922) by Mrs. William Starr Dana says you are likely to run across this plant while hunting for the purple flowers of the pitcher plant in the bogs during the month of May. Found along the borders of ponds, she says the curious club shaped object indicates its relationship to the Jack-in-the-Pulpit as well as the Calla Lily. Unlike them, Golden Club's tiny flowers are not shielded by a spathe. The Indians reportedly called this plant "Taw-Kee" and used its dried seeds as food.

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By mellielong on Apr 23, 2015 12:31 PM, concerning plant: Leatherwood (Dirca palustris)

The book "How to Know the Wildflowers" (1922) by Mrs. William Starr Dana says you can find these plants in wet thickets. In April they appear as a leafless shrub with bunches of insignificant yellow flowers "and a bark so tough that we find it almost impossible to break off a branch." She says this is the Leatherwood used by Indians for thongs. She also gives it the common name of "Moose-wood." The leaves appear later and are followed by a reddish oval fruit.

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By mellielong on Apr 23, 2015 12:26 PM, concerning plant: Wood betony (Pedicularis canadensis)

The book "How to Know the Wildflowers" (1922) by Mrs. William Starr Dana says the bright flowers of Wood Betony are found in the May woods alongside Columbine and Yellow Violet. Near Philadelphia they are said to be among the earliest flowers, coming soon after the trailing arbutus. Later in the year, the plant attracts attention "by its uncouth spikes of brown seed-pods."

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By mellielong on Apr 23, 2015 12:23 PM, concerning plant: Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara)

The book "How to Know the Wildflowers" (1922) by Mrs. William Starr Dana calls the plant an immigrant from Europe that is now thoroughly wild in the U.S. The author had trouble identifying this at first, having seen the lobed, heart-shaped leaves growing in moist ditches and along the banks or beds of streams. Then, one early May she discovered the plant in bloom on the banks of a stream in Berkshire. She describes the flower as bright yellow and looking something like a dandelion "with its heart plucked out, topping a leafless, scaly-bracted scape." The plant is also supposed to be a remedy for coughs.

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By mellielong on Apr 23, 2015 12:17 PM, concerning plant: Trout Lily (Erythronium americanum)

The book "How to Know the Wildflowers" (1922) by Mrs. William Starr Dana tells us that this plant can be found in April blooming in "one of those hollows in the wood which is watered by such a clear gurgling brook as must appeal to every country-loving heart." Each lily nods "guarded by a pair of mottled, erect, sentinel-like leaves."

The book gives two common names for this plant: Yellow Adder's Tongue and Dog's Tooth Violet. However, the author finds these highly unsatisfactory. Why call a lily a violet? Why indeed. She also asks if the markings of the leaves resemble the skin of an adder, why name it after its tongue? Mr. Burroughs, she says, has proposed two better names. The first, "Fawn Lily" because a fawn is also mottled and because the leaves stand up in a similar fashion to the alert, startled look of a fawn's ears. The second, "Trout Lily" because of its speckled foliage and flowering season has "a spring-like flavor not without charm." Let's be glad that nearly a century later the author got her wish! She also mentions the early settlers of Pennsylvania called the flower "Yellow Snowdrop".

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By mellielong on Apr 23, 2015 11:59 AM, concerning plant: Spicebush (Lindera benzoin)

The book "How to Know the Wildflowers" (1922) by Mrs. William Starr Dana says this is one of the very earliest flowers to be seen in the moist wood of spring. She says during the Revolution the powdered berries were used as a substitute for allspice, while the leaves served as a substitute for tea. She also gives the alternate common names of "Benjamin Bush" and "Fever Bush".

I can say that if you want to attract Spicebush Swallowtails to your butterfly garden, this plant is a must-have. I have only ever found the Spicebush on it despite claims that it is also used by the Tiger Swallowtail and Palamedes Swallowtail. That might be a regional thing, though. Even here in central Florida, the plants lose their leaves in the winter and leaf back out in spring. Also, as a person who raises caterpillars, I will say that this plant smells a lot better than some of the other host plants I have to pick!

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By mellielong on Apr 23, 2015 11:51 AM, concerning plant: Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris)

The book "How to Know the Wildflowers" (1922) by Mrs. William Starr Dana has some interesting information regarding this plant. Apparently, the marsh marigold is so abundant along certain English rivers that the ground looks as though it is paved in gold during the seasons when they overflow their banks. In the U.S. the author states the flowers are peddled on the streets every spring under the name "cowslip" but attributes this to confusion regarding English names. (That's why real gardeners use Latin!) She claims the plant is a favorite "pot-herb" among country people, supposedly far superior to spinach. The young buds are also quite palatable, she says. (Note: Do not eat things if you don't know that they're safe.)

As for the name, this plant has many. She speaks of the plant being called "Mary Growles" in the 16th century, and by early English poets as simply "gold". She hypothesizes the first part of the word may derive from the Anglo-Saxon "mere", meaning a marsh. The author suggests "Marsh-Gold" to be a far superior name for this "shining flower of the marshes."

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By mellielong on Apr 23, 2015 11:39 AM, concerning plant: Poison sumac (Toxicodendron vernix)

The book "How to Know the Wildflowers" (1922) by Mrs. William Starr Dana gives us some useful information on how to tell the difference between the poison variety and the more "innocent" sumacs. The poison variety can be distinguished by the "slender flower clusters which grow from the axils of the leaves, those of the innocent sumacs being borne in pyramidal, terminal clusters." Later in the year, you can tell the difference by the color of the fruit. The poison sumac has white or dun-colored fruits, while the other is crimson.

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By mellielong on Apr 23, 2015 11:35 AM, concerning plant: Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina)

The book "How to Know the Wildflowers" (1922) by Mrs. William Starr Dana says this is a common sumac which "illuminates our hills-sides every autumn with masses of flame-like color." She notes that this species has crimson fruit plumes whereas the poison sumac has white fruits. She supposes most people assume the common name of Staghorn Sumac refers to the shape of the pryamidal fruit clusters. However, the author believes the name is based upon the forked branches that appear after the leaves fall off.

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By mellielong on Apr 23, 2015 11:25 AM, concerning plant: Carrion Flower (Smilax herbacea)

In "How to Know the Wildflowers" (1922) by Mrs. William Starr Dana, the author quotes Thoreau as likening its odor to that of "a dead rat in the wall". The author notes that it is unfortunate that such a handsome plant is so handicapped by the foul odor of its flowers which appear in June. However, the plant really shines in autumn when the dark berries and deeply tinted leaves can be seen along roadsides and in woods and meadows. The plant is a near relation to common green-brier (S. rotundifolia) which can be distinguished by its prickly stem.

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By dorab on Apr 23, 2015 8:15 AM, concerning plant: Rose (Rosa 'Prairie Snowdrift')

I should note that this rose is hardy to zone 3 and was developed in Edmonton, Alberta, by Paul G. Olsen in 2008.

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By jmorth on Apr 22, 2015 5:23 PM, concerning plant: Small Cupped Daffodil (Narcissus 'Chinese White')

Bred by one of the world's top hybridizers of white daffodils, Guy Wilson from Northern Ireland, in 1937, this small-flowered, award-winning, all-white classic has a history hard to imagine in the world of daffodil creation. This cultivar is both seed and pollen fertile. It has been utilized in the former capacity 48 times and in the latter role 77 times. For the last 6 decades of the previous century, breeders in most of the English-speaking nations that breed daffodils (8) have used aspects of Chinese White to propagate new daffodils. Named offspring number 103, with 22 other documented seedlings.
Awards garnishing Chinese White include two Awards of Merit (1948 and 1949), two First Class Certificates (1949 and 1950), and a Preliminary Commendation in 1940. The ADS has included Chinese White on its highly vaunted Historics List.

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By MikeD on Apr 22, 2015 4:41 PM, concerning plant: Cucumber (Cucumis sativus 'Marketmore 76')

Bred by Dr. Henry M. Munger of Cornell University and released in 1976. Does well in cool climates.

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By bonitin on Apr 22, 2015 6:37 AM, concerning plant: Viridiflora Tulip (Tulipa 'Virichic')

A very interesting and artistic Tulip! Color tones and flame-like shape of flowers change not only with maturing, but also with each individual.
Some stay green and pale pink all through their development, while others show pink and green intensifying their colors and contrast with age.

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By plantrob on Apr 21, 2015 8:49 PM, concerning plant: Lenten Rose (Helleborus x hybridus 'Metallic Blue Lady')

Abundant blooms on a vigorous plant. One of my favorite lenten roses, for its unusual color and neat stature.

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By plantrob on Apr 21, 2015 8:40 PM, concerning plant: Magnolia (Magnolia 'Betty')

Of all the magnolias we grow, this is the only one that reblooms, not as abundantly as in early spring, but new flowers appear throughout the summer.

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By dave on Apr 20, 2015 7:58 PM, concerning plant: Wisteria (Wisteria frutescens 'Dam B')

Found at Dam B (a lake in Southeast Texas) and introduced by Lynn Lowrey. A native wisteria that is not aggressive like its Asian relatives.

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