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By Claudia on Jul 30, 2015 8:28 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Wild Mustang')

I have had this daylily since 2007. It increased very well for me. It gets lots of buds and has a long bloom time for me. What I do not like about this plant is that it makes very fat buds, so lots of the first buds to open are not able to open completely. For that reason, I decided to remove it from the garden this year.

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By Claudia on Jul 30, 2015 8:21 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Crimson Pirate')

Crimson Pirate was my very first spider daylily. Have had this plant for several years, but finally decided to get rid of it this year. This plant was either really good or did not do much. This year was a year when it did not do much. My main reason for getting rid of this plant is that it just multiplies too fast and needs to be divided too often.

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By vitrsna on Jul 30, 2015 3:42 PM, concerning plant: (Siraitia grosvenorii)

This plant is a member of the Cucurbitaceae Family, native to southwest China, and is cultivated for its fruit. It is a caudex-forming, herbaceous, perennial vine that climbs or creeps via tendrils. Requires rich, well-drained soil and germinates in a tropical shade environment (or greenhouse), at temperatures between 70-75 degrees F (21-24 C). Germination is said to take between 3 to 6 weeks, but 3 of the 7 I planted were up in 2 weeks. It can be grown successfully in containers with very fast-draining soil. Maturation is said to occur 240 days after planting. It loves humidity. The plants are male or female (dioecious), and one of each is required for the plant to set fruit, so it is recommended to grow at least 3 together in order to assure fruits. The vine is said to be hardy to 30 degrees F (0 degrees C) although it should be protected from frost. Fruits are very sweet, can be substituted for Stevia, and are eaten both fresh and dried. The rind is often prepared as a tea. Other medicinal properties have been attributed to the fruit of this plant.
Common names for this plant are Luo Han Guo Fruit, Arhat Fruit, Monk Fruit. Momordica grosvenorii is a synonym.

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By Chillybean on Jul 30, 2015 12:53 PM, concerning plant: Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa)

Finally, I have success with this plant! It took planting 5 flats from the nursery. I asked the owner to start these for me because I had a terrible time getting any to grow here, seed or plugs. This was my last resort. My one condition was NO chemicals. He started some in a greenhouse, but they died after they germinated nicely. He said they usually prevent that with a fungicide, but I wanted no chemicals. I am still firm on that, if I purchase plants intending insects to feed off them, they better not have any 'cides on them.

He started more, but kept them outside. Because spring was cold, it took them a long time to germinate. They were quite puny when I brought them home. Once it was consistently warm, then they really began growing. I did not expect any flowers the first year, but to my surprise I am getting excellent blooms... just beautiful. Even more so with the Monarch caterpillars on them. The Monarchs do use some of the flowers for nectar, but I see more of them on the Blazingstars.

I believe I discovered why I had a hard time growing these previously. I put them in clay soil and watered them too much. They like drier conditions and sandy/rocky soil. After the initial planting and maybe watering them for a week, the only water they get now is whatever the Lord provides.

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By Chillybean on Jul 30, 2015 12:38 PM, concerning plant: Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)

The Swamp Milkweed was one of my first native plants; put in a wet spot in our yard in spring 2012 as seedlings. Later that summer it was covered in the non-native Oleander Aphids. To my surprise, they came up the next spring and even bloomed, but that was the last I saw of them.

What a surprise! In a drier area of our yard, some came up this spring (2015). I sowed seeds in that patch in 2013 and they must've taken that long to germinate. There are three plants and they all have flowers! Monarch eggs have already been laid and the larvae are consuming this. So far, no sign of the aphids, but I check the plants regularly.

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By KentPfeiffer on Jul 30, 2015 11:33 AM, concerning plant: Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Billowing Waves')

Sibling of:

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Dancing Days')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Espionage')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Gambling Man')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Painted Shadows')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Swedish Lullaby')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Wishes Granted')

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By KentPfeiffer on Jul 30, 2015 11:30 AM, concerning plant: Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Swedish Lullaby')

Sibling of:

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Billowing Waves')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Dancing Days')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Espionage')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Gambling Man')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Painted Shadows')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Wishes Granted')

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By KentPfeiffer on Jul 30, 2015 11:30 AM, concerning plant: Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Painted Shadows')

Sibling of:

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Billowing Waves')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Dancing Days')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Espionage')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Gambling Man')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Swedish Lullaby')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Wishes Granted')

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By KentPfeiffer on Jul 30, 2015 11:30 AM, concerning plant: Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Espionage')

Sibling of:

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Billowing Waves')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Dancing Days')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Gambling Man')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Painted Shadows')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Swedish Lullaby')

Tall Bearded Iris (Iris 'Wishes Granted')

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By dave on Jul 30, 2015 6:23 AM, concerning plant: Kiwi (Actinidia chinensis 'AU Golden Dragon')

SFA Gardens (Nacogdoches, TX) reports this as their best kiwi found so far. It's a patented cultivar from Auburn University and my understanding is that it is not currently being offered anywhere for sale. Paired with Kiwi (Actinidia chinensis 'CK3') it produced 140 pounds of fruit from 8 vines.

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By dave on Jul 30, 2015 6:20 AM, concerning plant: Kiwi (Actinidia chinensis 'CK3')

Male pollinator cultivar. Recommended for growing in East Texas with Kiwi (Actinidia chinensis 'AU Golden Dragon') .

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By bonitin on Jul 30, 2015 5:20 AM, concerning plant: Three-cornered Garlic (Allium triquetrum)

This is the only allium that is really happy in my shady garden. In fact, it doesn't like full sun, unlike most, if not all alliums. It even self-sets in spots that get hardly any sun at all! Beautiful in all stages, even with seed pods. The leaves are pretty too, another bonus, and it blooms the longest of all alliums I know..

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By DogsNDaylilies on Jul 29, 2015 8:23 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Damascus Road')

The three pictures shown here look like they are three completely different daylilies. How strange! Does Damascus Road really have that much variation, or are there a couple of incorrect photo submissions?

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By ARoseblush on Jul 29, 2015 3:14 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Chang Dynasty')

For form, structure, and color, this is the perfect daylily. 'Chang Dynasty' will look as fresh at 6pm in the evening as it does at 8 AM. Year after year, its blooms glow in the garden, radiating those peach, coral, and yellow tones. Classic and elegant in form and structure, 'Chang Dynasty' is a beauty to behold. One of my favs!

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By DogsNDaylilies on Jul 29, 2015 10:21 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Gentle Shepherd')

Gentle Shepherd is probably my whitest white (I purchased it the day I took this photo). It starts out a little creamier in the morning and bleaches nicely into a whiter color. Its scapes aren't particularly strong, but are strong enough to support it standing straight up without bending or waving around too much.

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By Chillybean on Jul 29, 2015 9:56 AM, concerning plant: Maximilian Sunflower (Helianthus maximiliani)

I planted these for several reasons: Native to the US, not an annual, a lively spreader, and a natural food source for the birds. The Goldfinches just relish those greens and later the seeds as they dry. I have been concerned by the amount of pesticides put on bird food to prevent meal moths and the like. The birds get that in their mouths and we become exposed to it when we handle the seed.

Mine tend to bloom early, starting in July, but others wait until late August into September. The plant spreads mostly by rhizomes, but I have found a few from germinated seeds in other locations. It has not become bothersome in any way.

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By ARoseblush on Jul 29, 2015 9:09 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Florence Denny')

Daylily 'Florence Denny' is a monster of a plant. The 8 1/2 inch flower, with deeply ruffled edge, never hangs or droops with the weight of the flower. Florence always stands tall in my garden. This year she has outdone herself with 21 buds. This flower apparently is easy to hybridize. Fertile both ways. Because the flower is a neutral cream color, and if you are looking to promote a larger bloom size, this may be the plant to try. I will set pollen on it this summer. Always beautiful, and I believe underappreciated, 'Florence Denny' is an outstanding daylily.

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By materfan on Jul 28, 2015 9:14 PM, concerning plant: Gooseneck Loosestrife (Lysimachia clethroides)

These are pollinator magnets! All kinds of little fliers love them.

I have a bunch filling a 6'Lx3" W raised bed. A few escape, and are easily pulled up, and relocated on an embankment for erosion control.

I can see that someone might get annoyed if they wanted it in a certain area, and it randomly kept popping up out of boundaries, but if it's used "correctly" and given an area to itself to spread in, its boundaries can be easily maintained by a lawn mower, weed barrier, stonework, or even raised beds and walkways.

It shouldn't be planted near persons with bee sting allergies, because it bustles with pollinators, including bees and wasps.

It can self seed, and individual plants pop up in various places, and that might be what they mean by invasive.

Self sowing plants, if left there, can start new colonies, that would be hard to get rid of, especially in unmowable places.

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By magnolialover on Jul 28, 2015 8:52 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Wide Awake')

'Wide Awake' is one those daylilies that you remember being gorgeous, but only when it blooms are you reminded just how beautiful it is. It has amazing form and is elegant and delicate in both color and ruffling. A very special daylily indeed!

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By DogsNDaylilies on Jul 28, 2015 5:25 AM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Goose Bumps')

Very strong scapes on this cultivar!

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