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By chelle on Apr 18, 2014 6:51 AM, concerning plant: Climbing penstemon (Keckiella cordifolia)

Climbing penstemon (Keckiella cordifolia) seedlings are quite cold hardy and adaptable to wide temperature fluctuations. Seedlings transplanted outdoors under high cover have survived and show every sign of continuing to prosper; this batch having been started warm indoors, and then directly exposed to the following:

Day 1, 69°F / 32°F
Day 2, 33°F / 24°F
Day 3, 46°F / 23°F
Day 4, 66°F / 32°F

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By Esc on Apr 17, 2014 2:26 PM, concerning plant: Angel's Trumpet (Brugmansia 'Cassie's Curls')

I have a brugmansia. Cassie's curls. Angel's trumpet. I live in San Antonio. My yard faces west-south-west. A big oak tree blocks late afternoon sun. I am looking for advice on where to plant this. In a container? Hanging basket? My gardens are full and really don't have room. The plant arrived in the mail after our perennials came back and we added new so we're pretty full. Would appreciate any suggestions. I'm inexperienced with this plant. Thanks.

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By Bonehead on Apr 16, 2014 9:07 PM, concerning plant: Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides)

This is not my favorite tree, simply because it looks dead in the winter when I would like more of a lively presence. It's very beautiful when it first greens up, kind of a soft look to it, and is also nice in fall when it turns. Grows fairly quickly.

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By HamiltonSquare on Apr 16, 2014 8:44 PM, concerning plant: Blue Sage (Salvia reflexa)

I think that Salvia lanceolata is NOT a synonym of Salvia reflexa. There is a photo of one Savia reflexa with a blue flower and the rest with the pinkish flower and bracts are Salvia lanceolata in the ATP database. I'm growing the one with the showy rusty pink bracts and flowers. We have it listed as Salvia lanceolata and i was about to change it to reflexa............ Any Salvia experts in the ranks of ATP?

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By Bonehead on Apr 16, 2014 8:16 PM, concerning plant: Canada Thistle (Cirsium arvense)

This is a non-native invasive in the Pacific Northwest. It quickly will overwhelm an entire field and livestock generally won't eat it. The best way we've found to eradicate it is to simply mow it regularly. If it doesn't go to seed, it will eventually go away. Patience is a virtue.

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By eclayne on Apr 16, 2014 7:54 PM, concerning plant: Abyssinian Gladiolus (Gladiolus murielae)

Assuming that what I grow is in fact G. murielae, much of the literature underestimates its potential height. Last year was my first growing these, and in full sun and rich sandy loam my plants easily exceeded 4 feet in height. As recommended, I kept the soil constantly moist.
Some, but not all corms, flowered as Montbretia (Crocosmia 'Emberglow') reached its peak bloom. The pure white in the flowers works well with scarlet red. Bloom stalks continued to appear right up to first frost, at which point I cut them down and lifted them for winter storage. As 2013 was my first year growing these, I don't know whether this bloom cycle will occur again this year. As of a few days ago, all corms had overwintered well, stored in a box of peat in the basement. A bonus is the numerous white, pea-sized cormels they produced!

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By SongofJoy on Apr 16, 2014 5:40 AM, concerning plant: Yellow Chaenactis (Chaenactis glabriuscula)

This annual herb is native and endemic to California.

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By Seedfork on Apr 15, 2014 6:26 PM, concerning plant: Confederate Rose (Hibiscus mutabilis)

This plant is very easy to root from cuttings. I have had no luck starting it from seed.

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By farmerdill on Apr 15, 2014 4:56 PM, concerning plant: English Pea (Pisum sativus 'Blue Bantam')

This variety was introduced by Burpee in the early 20th century. After it was out of circulation for years, Burpee has reintroduced it. In my early childhood we grew Thomas Laxton and Little Marvel. In the 50's we replaced Little Marvel with Blue Bantam. Much more productive than Little Marvel and a good eating pea.

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By texaskitty111 on Apr 15, 2014 11:12 AM, concerning plant: Boysenberry (Rubus 'Boysenberry')

I believe this to be the best tasting berry of all. Not dry like a raspberry, seedy like a blackberry, sour like a gooseberry, or pithy like store bought strawberries. It's wonderful cooked or fresh. Grows on second year vines. Thornless version still has small thorns, original version (bigger thorns like blackberry vines) sets more fruit. Hard to find if you want to buy.

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By texaskitty111 on Apr 15, 2014 7:43 AM, concerning plant: Himalayan Blue Poppy (Meconopsis baileyi)

I have always thought that this flower is beautiful. I have never lived somewhere that it would grow. I've heard that it's easy if you live in the right place (cooler).

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By gardengus on Apr 15, 2014 7:41 AM, concerning plant: Storksbill (Erodium pelargoniflorum 'Sweetheart')

This is a beautiful little plant with dainty pink and white flowers. I have grown this plant twice, but it has failed to return in spring. Most likely not hardy here in my zone 5.

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By bonitin on Apr 15, 2014 3:39 AM, concerning plant: Sea Bean (Mucuna urens)

Don't touch the seed pod! I did as I was intrigued with it but felt it for days after in my fingers. What looks like hairs are actually very sharp needles that penetrate the skin!

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By gardengus on Apr 14, 2014 4:54 PM, concerning plant: Goji Berry (Lycium barbarum)

My two small plants managed to produce over a cup each of the berries. I hate reporting that the flavor is not pleasant (my opinion), but the berries have so many healthy ingredients that I found other ways to eat them. Just a tablespoon in any fruit smoothy and they go unnoticed. I did try a few dried then added to tea ...and, well, with some honey they didn't ruin the tea. Dried and dipped in chocolate, they were almost good , but most things are good covered in chocolate.

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By Seedfork on Apr 14, 2014 4:34 PM, concerning plant: Daylily (Hemerocallis 'Crimson Pirate')

This plant multiplies rapidly!

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By Skiekitty on Apr 14, 2014 1:30 PM, concerning plant: Rose (Rosa 'Macho Man')

Love this rose. Compact, not leggy. Pretty generous with blooms. Survives my zone 5 with winter mulch protection. FTW!

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By Skiekitty on Apr 14, 2014 1:29 PM, concerning plant: Rose (Rosa 'Lagerfeld')

Every single plant of this I have purchased (all grafted) all reverted back to Dr. Huey. Will try it again in 2015 by ordering one from Palatine. Love this rose. Good vase life, smells wonderful.

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By Skiekitty on Apr 14, 2014 1:27 PM, concerning plant: Rose (Rosa 'John F. Kennedy')

Was told by rosarians that this rose would not grow here in Colorado. I planted this rose back in '08. Blooms for me every year. Not very generous with blooms, dies back to the ground every winter, but produces beautiful white blooms every summer. Tolerates poor soil.

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By Skiekitty on Apr 14, 2014 1:23 PM, concerning plant: Rose (Rosa 'Incognito')

One of my favorite miniature roses. Love the lavender/russet color combination. No scent, unfortunately (at least none that I've smelled), but a very dependable rose that grows in partial shade for me.

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By Skiekitty on Apr 14, 2014 1:21 PM, concerning plant: Rose (Rosa 'Dr. Huey')

I think everyone who's grown roses has grown Dr. Huey. Most store-bought roses (especially "body bag" roses) are grafted onto Dr. Huey rootstock. It's a single bloomer and sends out incredibly long canes like a rambler. The canes are easy to distinguish from the "desired" rose, as usually they're darker (almost reddish) and have smaller thorns. Dr. Huey is an incredibly hardy rose that is not easily killed. It will send out suckers everywhere! Too many of my desirable roses reverted back to Dr. Huey the 2nd or 3rd year.

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